Lisa Rico’s Trip to Rwanda: Meeting Deborah

Today was the day for me to meet a couple of the women I sponsor through Women for Women International. It’s a rare experience for these women as few sponsors travel here. When it does happen, it’s a really big deal. As a sponsor, it’s a really big deal, too. How to describe the experience…I wish you could simply peer into my heart so you would know how it really felt.

My large green Range Rover that screams “muzungu” (white person), pulls into a small rural area where a couple dozen locals are hanging out. I scan the crowd, certain I won’t recognize my “sister” from the tiny photo I was given months ago. I was right; I didn’t recognize her at all. But I did recognize the look in her eyes. She knew who we were and moved toward us. We embrace. We embrace again. I can feel her small body shaking. She starts to cry. I offer the handful of Rwandan words I know. Then I need a translator. So good to meet you. How are you? Are you enjoying the Women for Women program? What are you learning?

She asks if I could visit her home nearby. We pile into the vehicle and head out. Nearby is farther than I thought, down a long road that looks more like a dry creek bed. All along the way there are children looking with curious eyes and waving at our passing vehicle.

We finally arrive at her small mud home. Neat and tidy, with no windows, a low doorway, dirt floor and grass roof. There is no water or electricity. The entire house is about the size of my kitchen. Deborah lives here with her two children, age 13 and 3. Because her brother and sister-in-law were killed during the genocide, her brother’s two children, ages 11 and 13, live here as well. Add her mother and that’s six in this tiny space. I can’t imagine.

Deborah says life is better, and I believe her. But she is not one of the many Rwandan women whose big bright smiles leave you thinking, she must have been out of town during the genocide because she looks so happy. No, when you look into Deborah’s eyes you know life has been, and continues to be, a hard, rough climb.

We eventually say goodbye, and I leave knowing this is not finished. I know when I wake up in the middle of the night in the days and months to come, Deborah’s face will be there.

Lisa Rico is a sponsor through Women for Women International. She is currently traveling in Rwanda.

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Filed under Africa, Rwanda

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